NDACC News

September
2011

The Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) provides near-continuous, long-term, in situ-observed, Earth-surface, broadband irradiances (solar and thermal infrared) and certain related parameters from a network of more than 50 globally diverse sites. The observed data are collected, processed and reviewed by the individual sites' scientists and subsequently provided to network's central data archive and dissemination center, the World Radiation Monitoring Center (WRMC), located at the Alfred Wagner Institute in Bremerhaven, Germany (AWI).

December
2010

An international Symposium celebrating 20 years of global atmospheric research enhanced by NDACC/ NDSC observations will be held the November 7–10, 2011 in Saint Paul, Reunion Island, France. The symposium is being organized by the Observatoire de Physique de l'Atmosphere de la Reunion. Attendees will be given the opportunity to visit the Maido Observatory which is scheduled to begin operations in early 2012. A Symposium web site will be available in March 2011 for registration, abstract submission, and booking.  The abstract deadline is June 10, 2011.

May
2010

NDACC established the designation of "Cooperating Network" to formalize the relationship with regional, hemispheric, or global networks of instruments that operate independently of NDACC, but where strong measurement and scientific collaboration is mutually beneficial. More information on the "Cooperating Network" Protocol is found in the "Protocols" area of the NDACC web pages.

In the Fall of 2009, five Networks signed memoranda of understanding to complete the Cooperating Network designation. These networks are:

May
2010

High spectral-resolution infrared solar transmission spectra contain information about the vertical distribution of the absorbing species in the terrestrial atmosphere due to the pressure broadening of the absorption lines. This feature is being exploited in the Infrared Working Group to retrieve vertical profile information of several atmospheric trace gases, such as O3, CO, N2O, CH4, HCl, HF, HNO3, C2H6 and HCN, in addition to the total column abundances.

May
2010

A highly variable interference has long been considered the dominant feature of water vapor for practitioners who retrieve atmospheric total column amounts and profiles from infrared solar absorption spectra. Due to the importance of water as a greenhouse gas and its possible long-term trend resulting from changes in the atmosphere and subsequent feedback effects there is renewed effort in extracting water vapor quantities from archived solar spectra, which for some sites stretch back to the 1970's.

Pages